Compendium of Wondrous Links vol VII

wondrous_links

Here we go again… This time I’m loosely grouping them, it has been a while and there are so many things!

  • An extremely though-provoking article about the possible positive things can have a negative effect. How Perks Can Divide Us. Corporate culture is something extremely complex.
  • Mora about culture and biases on Mirrorcracy.
  • I do not like the idea that people have a “level”, ignoring all the dynamics (I talked about this here). There are no B players.
  • A set of articles talking about management skills. Is a great compilation of the different aspect of management. Great read even if you’re not “an official manager”, as is capital to understand what are the things that a (good) manager should do and challenges that the role presents
  • Some ideas about productivity. I like this quote a lot: “There is no one secret to becoming more productive, but there are hundreds of tactics you can use to get more done”
  • We tend to idealise the work involved in some stuff we really like. In particular in creating video games. It’s okay not to follow your dreams, but I think it could apply to a lot of other aspects

Dragon's Lair

 

 

80 chars per line is great

Probably the most controversial part of PEP 8 is the limit of 80 characters per line. Well, is actually 79 chars, but I’ll use 80 chars because is a round number and the way everybody referes to it.

Capture all the experience
Capture all the experience

There are a lot of companies where the standard seems to be “PEP8, except for the 80 chars line restriction”. On GitHub projects, which in general follow PEP8 (it seems to be a very strong consensus), that’s typically not found. In explicit code guidelines, the restriction could be increased (100, 120) or even removed at all. The usual reason for that is stating that we are not programming in VT100 terminals any more, and we have big, high-resolution screens. This is true, but I’ve found that that limitation, combined with the use of whitespace in Python, makes the code much more compact and readable.

It seems that, naturally, Python code tends to occupy around 35-60 characters (without indentation). Longer lines than that are much less frequent. Having suddenly a line much longer than the rest feels strange and somehow ugly. Also, having the mandatory indentation whitespace increase the line width is a good visual way of minimising the nested loops in your code and suggesting, in a subtle way, to refactor anything that is indented more than about four times.

For example, compare this:

Continue reading “80 chars per line is great”