Make beautiful Python code (talk at PyCon IE ’13)


Another year, another amazing PyCon. I guess I repeat myself, but I keep being impressed about the quality of the talks and the friendly, vibrant atmosphere. It is always a pleasure to spend some time with people interested in code and technology… There was also an increase in the number attendees, and quite a lot students. I said that on Twitter, but Python Ireland, you guys rock.

Of all the talks I attend to, I’d like to comment two that were especially interesting. The first was one of the keynotes, PRISM-as-a-Service: Not Subject to American Law, by Lynn Root. All this think is pretty scary when you think about it. Definitively worth a read. The other one was The Clean Architecture in Python, by Brandon Rhodes, about ways of designing code and make them data-centric.

I also gave a talk, and other than a problem with the project that made me rush a little, I think it went good. Just in case you’re interested, here are the slides. Here is also the PDF version with notes.

Oh, and another thing. there are launching the pyLadies Dublin group this wednesday 15th October, so if you’re interested, show up.

 

UPDATE: Added slides for Brandon Rhodes talk

Great female participation on PyCon US 2013


This picture is AMAZING

This picture is AMAZING

I have read that around 20% of PyCon attendees were women. I’m sure I’ve seen it on more places I can’t find at the moment, but is at least here.

This is fantastic news, a great success for the PyCon, the Python community, and specially groups like PyLadies and Lady Coders. The opening statements of Jesse Nollan is a must see.

As I have previously expressed some concerns in this blog about whether requiring a Code of Conduct is the best approach, I’d like to say that I was wrong and it seems that had a positive impact. The CoC is also currently under review, and I’m sure it will be improved. It has also been used with great care, as the PyCon blog shows, which is also something to kudos.

There has also been special programming tracks for kids, which is awesome.

Of course, that is not the end of the road, and there is still much to do, but it is very encouraging. Keep on the good track!

Thoughts on Code of Conducts


I’ve just read this statement from the PSF about requiring a Code of Conduct, and I felt somehow a little down.

Don’t get me wrong, I don’t think that a CoC is something bad, and everything it says (at least the referenced PyCon US one and the example in geekfeminism.com) makes sense. It’s just that needing a CoC feels a little … formal.

I don’t like very much formality, as I like to think that PyCon conferences are more a bunch of somehow friends getting together and sharing knowledge. I’ve always felt very welcomed in the Python community here in Ireland, and the atmosphere in PyCon IE (and other meetings) is absolutely fantastic. I haven’t seen anything that I will consider remotely discriminatory (like I saw back on my college years, for example). I’ve always imagined that the rest of the Python conferences and communities have the same “magic”.

Of course, I am seeing this from my particular, mainstream european-male point of view. I am a foreigner here in Ireland, but less say on “close, european orbit”. I’m not sure if some of the problems that the CoC tries to avoid are present and I am just not noticing. I’d like to think that’s not the case.

I don’t know, makes me think about what is the general perception and behaviour of the development community. I know there is discussion out there about wether the  geek population is welcoming to diversity or just a bunch of jerks that just can’t behave (and all the spectrum in between). I guess it just makes me sad to think that we may need “an adult” telling us not to say things that we already know that we shouldn’t. It’s 2012, we have no excuse.

As I say, I just feel a little… disappointed. Like thinking that there is something wrong in all that, that we are grow up and that things are not on the same level of friendly informality. That we need rules to ensure everyone feels safe. I guess that a small number of spoiled brats that can’t behave like adults and are just ruining the party to everyone else. :-(

Talks on PyCon Ireland 2012


Well, as usual, this year’s PyCon Ireland has been amazing. I always get impressed by the high quality of the talks and, in general, how much the attendants know. It is always a pleasure to share some thoughts about technology with incredibly talented people. Python Ireland is doing a great job.

This year I didn’t give one talk, but TWO! It was very exhausting, but fun. I am posting the slides here, in case someone find them interesting…

You can also download the source Keynote file, which includes notes.

EDIT: Videos added

Django and Rails and Grails, Oh my!


On the PyCon Ireland I give a talk comparing between Django, Ruby on Rails and Grails framework… I just forget to put a link on this blog!

The presentation can be found at Prezi, and there is even a video, if someone wants to make funny comments on my exotic accent :-P A problem with the projector doesn’t allow me to display the slides, so I felt a little weird taking the laptop and pointing at the screen, but the people making the video has make their homework and shows the proper slides on place. Nice!

Presentation

Video

The original idea was to show the same simple application (a simple posting service) make with the three frameworks, but not being able to display on the projector really ruined it. Anyway, the code can be downloaded here, if you want to take a look.

Let me know what do you think!